Posts in Lifestyle
Editing Photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos
 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos
 
 

Backstory for this “Editing Photos on your iPhone” series:

People often ask me what camera I use to take the photos for this blog. And most of the time, they’re surprised to find out that many of the photos were taken and edited on my iPhone. The iPhone camera is no joke, especially with features like Portrait mode. It’s also super convenient for taking photos while traveling or cooking (the idea of having an expensive DSLR by your stove kinda turns me off). You can also find some amazing apps on the app store that will work just as well as Photoshop and prevent you from airdropping photos back and forth between your phone and your computer.

Did you learn some basic color correcting tools in Part 1 yet?

Part 2 TL;DR:

“I took a crappy photo in a nice place. But it has so many distractions in the background that I wish I could get rid of! What should I do?”

The unedited photo:

 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos
 
 

Goodness gracious! There are so many things wrong with this photo. It’s so hard not to just delete it. But what I do like about this photo is that it’s pretty candid. I really like the movement of the walking, and it really conveys the feeling of being on a trip.

Let’s identify what’s wrong with the photo:

  1. It’s too dark, and most of the photo is in the shadows

  2. There’s trash everywhere on the floor! (For reference, this was shot in the Monti neighborhood of Rome in the morning—so after a wild night out drinking for a lot of Romans)

  3. There’s a trash can taking up a lot of space on the left side of the photo

  4. The photo is lopsided (the walls of the buildings are tilted)

The apps that I’m going to use to fix these issues are:

 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos

Step 1: Make the trash disappear

The trash in this photo really doesn’t contribute to the “traveling” vibe of this photo at all and is only a distraction. Let’s remove it by following these steps in TouchRetouch:

  1. Go to the object removal tab

  2. Tap on the brush tool

  3. Brush away the trash by adjusting the brush size and zooming in for precision

  4. Compare before and after by tapping the second icon from the right in the top toolbar

 
 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos

Step 2: Straighten and crop the photo

To fix the tilt of the photo, lets open it up in the Lightroom app:

  1. Select the crop & rotate tool

  2. Crop parts of the image that are uninteresting—like the trash can on the left. This will also make the composition of the photo better and place the subject of interest on the lower left third of the photo (which is more interesting than in the center)

  3. Rotate the image until the lines of the buildings line up with the grid lines of the image.

 
 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos

Step 3: Color correction

Let’s also do some color adjustment in the Lightroom app as well.

In the Light tab:

  1. Bump the exposure to brighten the image

  2. Bump the contrast to make the image pop a bit more

  3. Increasing the exposure may have caused the buildings in the distance to become too washed out. Because of this, I reduced the highlights so we can see more of the building’s details.

  4. Reduce the shadows that was overwhelming most of the image before

In the Color tab:

  1. Make the image warmer to give it a more summery vibe (the warm tones of the building really go well with my dress!)

  2. Increase the saturation to make the image more colorful

 
 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos

Step 4: Creative last tweaks:

In VSCO:

  1. Choose a filter that compliments your photo. In my case, I chose the “Fuji Provia 400x” filter, which gives my photo a film-like vibe. You can also adjust the warmth of this filter.

  2. Final adjustments:

    • Increase the exposure

    • Make the shadows weaker

    • Sharpen the image

    • Bump the contrast a bit more

 

original photo vs Final photo with edits:

Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 2: Removing distracting objects in travel photos
 
 

And voilà! A disastrous photo turned into one that you can actually post on Instagram! The edited photo gives off so much more of a summer vibe, and is free of distractions like the trash on the floor. The composition has improved as well: having the subject offset from the center of the image puts more emphasis on where she’s going rather than on her. (Why am I speaking of myself in the third person…?)

For more iPhone photo help, please check out part 1 of this series!

♥ Cindy

 
Lifestyle, 2Cindy ZhangComment
Editing Photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Basic color correction
 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Basic color correction
 
 

Backstory for this “Editing Photos on your iPhone” series:

People often ask me what camera I use to take the photos for this blog. And most of the time, they’re surprised to find out that many of the photos were taken and edited on my iPhone. The iPhone camera is no joke, especially with features like Portrait mode. It’s also super convenient for taking photos while traveling or cooking (the idea of having an expensive DSLR by your stove kinda turns me off). You can also find some amazing apps on the app store that will work just as well as Photoshop and prevent you from airdropping photos back and forth between your phone and your computer.

Part 1 TL;DR:

“I went to a beautiful place on a gloomy day. All my photos look depressing af.”

 

The unedited photo:

How to edit your photos to look amazing on an iPhone
 

Ah yes, we chose to go to one of the most beautiful destinations in Australia on a gloomy day and as a result, snapped some depressing-looking photos. But let’s not delete it yet. We can do a lot of post-processing of this photo (all on our phones!) to make it look gorgeous.

First, let’s identify what’s wrong with the photo:

  1. It’s dark and depressing. Lots of shadows

  2. Waters are greenish. That’s kinda weird… and kinda gross.

  3. Left side of photo is really bright from the sun while the right side is super dark

 
How to edit your photos to look amazing on an iPhone
 
IMG_7788.PNGHow to edit your photos to look amazing on an iPhone

First of all, let’s do our most basic editing to ensure the photo’s lighting is corrected before we start doing more of the creative stuff. I like to start off with the Adobe Lightroom CC app to do these initial edits. I can save this edited photo as a “baseline” to start with. Then, I can go into more creative apps like VSCO to do some extras at the end.

  • Exposure (+0.78)—making the image brighter overall

  • Contrast (+4)—making the image more vibrant, and colors pop out more

 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
How to edit photos on your phone — Part 1: Color Correction
 

A lot of the “depressing-ness” of this photo also comes from the fact that there is a huge amount of shadow on the rocks, making you barely able to see their details. We can solve that by doing the following:

  • Shadows (+15)—Increasing this field will make the shadows less prominent, while decreasing it will make them heavier

We can also amp up the colors to make the photo look more exciting and less depressing. YAY COLOR.

  • Vibrance (+26)

  • Saturation (+25)

 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
 

K, cool. So now our photos is bright and colorful and less depressing. But did it get a little too bright in the process? Maybe. It looks like the sky got a little overexposed on the left side of the image.

We can solve this by using the handy-dandy selective edits tool that Lightroom offers as one of its paid features (around a dollar per month). This step is totally unnecessary. But if you’re a little OCD like me, here are the steps you should take to get rid of that brighter area:

  • In Selective Edits, use the circle tool to select the area you want to edit. You can also adjust the location and size of your circle. Everything in this circle will be adjusted to your liking without affecting the rest of the photo

  • Bring down the exposure in the “light” panel.

Note that this trick isn’t just for exposure edits. You can take advantage of this selective editing tool to give more color to parts of images that need it (this especially works well for food photos).

 

Edits after using the Lightroom app:

Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Basic color correction
 

Pretty nice eh? The photo’s still not perfect, but it’s definitely a lot better than the original! People will start questioning you at this point: what camera did you use to take this?

One negative thing that stands out about this photo is how green the waters look. Not the most appealing, right? Let’s fix that by opening this photo up in our second app: VSCO.

 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
 

To make the greens in the water less prominent, and to make the oceans look more blue, go to the “HSL” tab at the very right side of the edits carousel. Note that this feature is also for members only. But I find a lot of VSCO’s member-only features super helpful, especially if you don’t want to import this photo into photoshop on your computer. Plus, you get to edit videos on VSCO too. And a bunch of film filters.

More about the HSL tool from VSCO: “It gives you control to adjust the Hue, Saturation and Lightness of a specific color in the image.  It gives you fine-tuned control over 6 hue regions— red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple. By selecting one color at a time, you can isolate adjustments for that particular color without affecting other color present in the image.”

In my case, I wanted less green and more blue.

So, in the greens tab:

  • Saturation (-3.3)—makes the color green less saturated overall

In the blues tab:

  • Saturation (+2.1)—makes the blues more saturated

  • Hue (+2.1)—makes the blues have more of a magenta hue rather than a green hue

 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Basic Color Correction
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Basic Color Correction
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
 

After you’ve done most of your basic edits to the photo, you can get into the fun part: choosing a filter! I absolutely love the wide range of filters that VSCO provides, and the emotions that they convey. But sometimes, a filter may be a little too vibrant, and you may need to dial it down, just allowing it affect your photo by a teeny-tiny bit. Remember, you don’t want to let your photo speak for the filter, you want your filter to speak for the photo.

  • Decided on the filter, L6.

  • Dialed it down to only +2.2, because it was a little too blue and orange in its full capacity.

  • Dialed down the hue and saturation for blues in HSL, because the filter was making the photo look too blue.

 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Basic Color Correction
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
 

Last but not least, let’s sharpen our photo a little and bring up the saturation just a tiny bit. Don’t go overboard with the sharpening though—it will end up making your photo look hand-drawn rather than like a real photo.

 

Final photo with Lightroom app + VSCO edits

What do you think? Here’s the original photo and the edited one side by side:

 
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
Editing photos on your iPhone — Part 1: Color Correction
 
 

Thought this was helpful? Go on to part 2 to learn more about how you can make unwanted stuff magically disappear in your photos!

♥ Cindy

 
Lifestyle, 2Cindy ZhangComment
Tour of my San Francisco Apartment

Video was shot using the iPhoneX + DJI Osmo Mobile 2 for stabilization. Edited with Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2018 and Adobe After Effects CC 2018.

 
San Francisco Apartment Tour
 
 

It’s finally heeeere!! The highly-requested video tour of my San Francisco apartment! In this post you’ll also find links to most of the furniture/decor in each room.

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour
San Francisco Apartment Tour
 
 

I’ve been meaning to do a house tour for the longest time, but I’ve also been constantly putting it off because I wasn’t ready to consider my apartment in a “finished” state yet. I’m constantly adding and editing, so the apartment ends up looking pretty different from month to month. In the end I realized that it was never going to be in a “done” state, because my style will always evolve, and the apartment will evolve with me. So in September, I sucked it up and filmed the house tour. I didn’t get around to editing it until late October.

 
 
 
kitchen
 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Kitchen
 
 

The birthplace of all food content on this blog

When you enter the house, you’re immediately greeted by the kitchen. Don’t be deceived by the marble countertops though—they’re actually not real. I achieved this effect by covering the original black counter tops with marble contact paper.

 
 
 
 

Marble Contact Paper - Amazon | Marble Cutting Board - Amazon | Plant + Holder - IKEA | Artificial flower - Daiso | Wooden Cutting Board - IKEA | Soap Dispenser - Muji

 
 
JPEG image-A7A722D66B22-27.jpeg
 
 

Smeg Retro Toaster in Pastel Green - Amazon | Artificial Flower - IKEA

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour
 
 

Round dining table - Amazon | Eames DSW lookalike chairs - eBay | “Stockholm” Pillow - IKEA | Artificial Cherry Blossoms - Daiso | Fujifilm Instax Polaroid Camera - Urban Outfitters | Mini Succulents - World Market

 
 
 
living room
 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Living Room
 
 

Where Creative shit gets done

This is my place to relax after a long day, but also the place to get shit done. All the practicing for gigs happens here, as well as actual work work on WFH Wednesdays. To make this the perfect place to spark creative energy, I decorated the space with a lot of wall art, colorful accents, and plants.

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Living Room
 
 

“Pisces” art print - Society6 | Map of New York art print - Society6

For the rest of the prints on the wall, I download the images online and printed them at Walgreens. I then added on cheap frames from IKEA and Michael’s.

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Living Room
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Living Room
 
 

“Lisabo” desk - IKEA | Chair - IKEA | Rose gold lamp - Amazon | Wall grid - Daiso | Acrylic Drawers - Muji | Jewelry Holders - Daiso

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Living Room
San Francisco Apartment Tour - The Living Room
 
 

“Soderhamn” sofa - IKEA | Coffee Table in mint green - Anthropologie | Classical Guitar - Lucero LC235SCE | Eames DSW lookalike armchair - Wayfair | Black/Ivory Southwestern stripe throw pillow - Target | Floor Lamp - Wayfair | 8-bit playing cards - Amazon

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Living Room
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Living Room
 
 

“Mulig” clothing rack - IKEA | Round throw pillow - Target | Turkish blanket - Out of stock, find similar on Truck & Barter

As a general rule of thumb: try to keep large pieces like sofas neutral. Choose a versatile shade like white or grey so you can get creative with the accents you add on top. This way, you can change them easily when your style changes, and when trends come and go.

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Living Room
 
 

Yamaha P71 Electric Keyboard - Amazon | Canvas art - Society6 | Retro red clock - Amazon

 
 
 
bedroom
 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Bedroom
 
 

Where the magic (of sleep) happens

Since this apartment is not quite a full one-bedroom, the bedroom is quite small and doesn’t have a door. Because of the lack of space, I tried to keep the room super minimal by opting out of a bed frame and just putting the mattress on the floor. As for the bedside table, I created a lightweight replacement by laying some heavy books on top of a simple stool.

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Bedroom
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Bedroom
 
 

Coral embroidered round throw pillow - Target | Square light pink throw pillow - Target | White textured throw blanket - Amazon | Bedding - IKEA | “Marius” Stool (used as makeshift bedside table) - IKEA | Lamp + plant - Target | Guitar - Yamaha FG800

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Bedroom
 
 

Hanging light - IKEA | Amsterdam map art - Society6 | Black and white line canvas art - Society6 | Vase - Amazon

 
 
 
Bathroom
 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Bathroom
San Francisco Apartment Tour - Bathroom
 
 

Shower Curtain - IKEA | “Marius” Stool - IKEA | Circle rug - World Market | Marble Contact Paper - Amazon

 
 
 
 

Where the 7-step Skincare Routine Happens

Okay, maybe it’s more like 5 steps for me. But I love unwinding here after a long with my nighttime skincare regimen, and then starting my day on the right foot by taking good care of my skin. My favorite brand for skincare products right now is CosRX, a Korean brand that provides super affordable solutions that are also super effective.

 
 
San Francisco Apartment Tour
 
 

Hope you had fun watching the tour of my apartment and reading through this post! Hopefully you got some new ideas for decorating your own space, or at least found something you would like to buy for yourself. If you’re interested in seeing my old 200 square feet apartment and seeing how I made such a tiny space work, please (re)visit this post I put up about a year ago—or the Apartment Therapy article!

♥ Cindy

 
Lifestyle, Home, 2Cindy ZhangComment
We made a K-pop cover and a cake in under 2 hours!

Cover of "Friday" (금요일에 만나요) - IU with Yi-Jeong of History by Anna + Cindy

 

Last week I got to hang out with a friend from UCSD (also from the a cappella community and a K-pop lover!), Anna, and we made a little somethin somethin for y'all listen to! Kudos to her for editing in the bloopers as well, so stayed tuned until the end for those ;) Make sure to subscribe to her YouTube channel, and to check out her Japan and Korea vlogs!

It feels so good to come back to my K-pop grind and to sing all my guilty pleasure songs again—especially because I've mostly been singing English Jazz standards in preparation for gigs lately. I actually powered through a lot of my early days of learning guitar by using K-pop guitar tutorials to learn the chords to my favorite songs. Shout out to the Caffeine Guitar channel and this video for teaching me how to play this song in particular. 

But... that's not it! We also baked an entire cake!

 
 
Blood Orange Black Sesame Cake
 
 

How badass are we for making an entire cover while before our cake finished baking? This day was really a creative and productive stay-at-home day. It feels therapeutic to create something like music or food, which is nearly not as stressful as creating code, for example.

The story behind this creative day? After posting numerous posts about my baking adventures on Instagram, I found out that Anna loved to bake and cook as well. So we decided to get together to bake this Blood Orange Black Sesame Loaf Cake, courtesy of this recipe I found on Pinterest.

 
 
 
 

I'm really loving the pink color that the blood orange juice creates for the icing of this cake. I've seen so many bakeries around San Francisco incorporate black sesame into their items these days. I recently tried the Orange Sesame Cake from Tartine Manufactory and the Black Sesame Banana Bread from Provender Coffee. After realizing that sesame gives an interesting (even savory, I would say?) flavor to balance out the sweetness of baked goods, I was eager to come back home to try it myself.

 
 
Blood Orange Black Sesame Cake
 
 

Aren't you proud of me for composing two blog posts in under two days? <rant> This is because I finally finished a big chunk of a project at work and now I'm finally spending some quality time with my hobbies rather than coding until 4AM on weekends. (I'm still typing this blog post at 2AM on a Sunday, but it somehow feels more reasonable) In other words, my job is too stress-inducing and maybe I should try to transition into a role that's better for someone who has bad anxiety issues already. </rant> Whatever. Good night y'all.

♥ Cindy

 
 
2017 Year In Review
IMG_3185.JPG
 
 

Like almost every other millennial, I’ve tried my hardest this year to create a down-to-the-pixel version of myself on social media. Far from accurate, of course, this contrived version of “Cindy Zhang” stemmed from working at a social media company focused on showing users beautiful images and from watching the talented friends around me live their lives to the fullest on Instagram. I felt a pressure to do the same by showing off the most artistic and wittiest parts of me on the internet. As 2017 comes to an end, I want to be more sincere and tear down that image temporarily—if you don’t mind—and walk you through an honest rewind of the year for me.

The latter half of 2017 was—to say the least—mentally, physically, and emotionally exhausting.

Mentally because expectations at work were not low, and working on an app that is used by millions of people is not easy. I came to understand that everything I built was fragile: poor code written on top of poor code. As that poor code festered in the repository, I woke up to crashes and a swarm of bugs created by that poor code. What was the most mentally straining however, was not things breaking but how I reacted to things breaking. I found my coworker constantly telling me to -breathe- during stressful situations that I handled with shaking hands at the keyboard—trying to fix a NullPointerException in order to make the next release so that the press article scheduled to go out at 10AM was accurate. But maybe I didn’t have to freak out that much. Maybe code is just code and the world won't end if Pinterest crashes for a few users.

I’m physically exhausted from actively choosing not to take care of myself. I had hit my all time low weight of 84 pounds in the second half of this year, which even at the short height of 5’3”, is a little bit alarming and enough to make my mother worried. I’ve struggled with my weight since sixth grade, so this is not the least bit new to me; but I feel like this year my body has taken the worst blow in the last twelve years or so.

I’m emotionally exhausted because I cut ties with many friends this year and saw several relationships come to an end. This may have a lot to do with the fact that 2017 was the first full year I spent away from San Diego, where most of my close friends reside. It might also have to do with the fact that I’ve changed quite a lot in the past year, and no longer identify with the many surface-level friends I’ve made in college. Losing friends, unfortunately, didn’t stop at losing friends. A relationship coming to an end somehow brought all things associated with that relationship to an end. This made me create a new set of boundaries on my life to restrain me to what I was allowed to touch and see on the internet, and even songs I was allowed to sing and listen to. Relationships going sour made me quite paranoid at what people back home were saying about me, and whether they were laughing at me behind my back. Because their perception of me is only as good as someone else’s, I felt like I had no control over their opinion of me if they’ve already sided with someone who thought negatively of me.

Anyways, this was my first serious relationship ever, so excuse me if I let my introvert tendencies slip into something that required so much communication.

OKAY, let’s take a break from all this. Yes I am exhausted, but I’ve also grown a lot in 2017, and after taking a lot of hits from this year, I can confidently say that I’ve grown in these 2 areas: music and engineering.

 

Music

 

I learned how to play the guitar!!! This still seems a little bit crazy to me because in the beginning I had a lot of insecurities holding me back and could come up with a million reasons why I didn’t need to learn guitar. The first being that everyone my age already knew how to play it, and I was too much of a late bloomer to even bother. A girl singing with a guitar is also far from original and seems like a musical cliche, doesn’t it?

When I started out, my fingers did not comply and I found it almost impossible to produce the simplest sound. Because I had been studying classical violin since 4th grade, it was mind-boggling to me to move my fingers in ways that were frowned upon in my violin training but were standard techniques for guitar. I had a hard time convincing my stubborn fingers to change their behavior and admitting that I was playing a guitar and not just a bigger violin.

There was a huge learning curve, but the solution to that learning curve was the same solution to everything else in music—more practice and more listening. I made it a goal to practice every single night, even if I was busy and it was far beyond my bedtime. Eventually it became a nightly routine—like brushing my teeth! I figured with even just a small amount of practice every day, I would gradually get better.

After listening to my favorite acoustic guitar jams at work and practicing nightly, everything about the guitar turned out to be incredibly intuitive, and it opened up an entirely different world of music to me. Technically, it allowed me to visualize chords clearly and made me appreciate how easy it was to transition between consecutive chords of the same quality (even sliding into them to say the least! That’s unheard of on a piano!). Creatively, it allowed me to develop a different approach to songwriting from the one I become comfortable with on the piano. Can we also talk about how beautiful the acoustic guitar sounds? It sounds so incredibly... sad... like, in a good way. I love it.

But no means am I any good at guitar yet. I’m just more familiar with basic functions and I still have a lot to improve on in 2018.

I started doing gigs by myself! I probably should’ve started doing this sooner but always found myself in musical situations where I was only contributing a small portion to the full picture. I’ve constantly been surrounded by talented musicians and so I’ve become reliant on them to take care of me as a struggling musician. After doing a few shows by myself, I developed the skill of quick error recovery, meaning: not giving a shit when I sing/play the wrong note and moving on. I learned that in order to be a good performer, you need to put all your emotion and skill on the current note you’re playing (maybe a bit of thought on upcoming notes as well), and not linger on past mistakes you’ve made.

 

Engineering

 

The engineers at Pinterest are some of the most hardworking people I know, and I’m happy to say that I’ve learned a huge amount from them this year. There are a few who have been amazingly helpful in explaining difficult concepts to me and held my hand when I ran into challenges. I am incredibly grateful to those people and I’m confident to say that I’m a better engineer today because of them.

Pinterest Lens was my biggest project within my first six months at Pinterest. It was a huge technical challenge and I spent many long nights trying to build the smallest parts of it on Android. Luckily, I was able to finish the front end in preparation for a press event, and even did a tech talk around it in March. Doing an interview with Mercury News was another new and exciting step forward this year—mainly because I’ve been daunted by the idea of public speaking my whole life. Luckily, the PR people at Pinterest are, like the engineers, total beasts and helped me a tremendous amount in tackling these interviews and improving my public speaking skills.

I also ended up writing my first blog post for the Pinterest Engineering blog about Pincodes, which was technically challenging mostly due to dealing with a third-party library and working with external engineers. This was yet another project that made me realize that being a good product engineer does not mean just being a good programmer. It’s crucial for engineers to be good at communicating and to bring up concerns about what is technically feasible or not during meetings—which was, again, tough for an introvert like me. I'm still trying very hard these days to develop a good sense of the product and voice opinions from a perspective different than the PM’s or the designer’s, and to not hate the sound of my voice as I'm speaking up meetings.


I wanted to end this year on a good note. So even though my reaction to 2017 was not the most positive, I want to remind myself that a lot went right this year and I should be fortunate that I have the opportunity to improve as a musician, engineer, friend, and daughter. Growing is by no means painless and it would be worse to be blind to stress and to overlook the problems that I have the ability to solve. I’m fortunate that I was able to come face to face with many challenges this year and—for the most part—overcome them.

 
 
2, LifestyleCindy ZhangComment